• MSNBC video feature on GoodWeave

    There was a web piece on MSNBC last week about the work of the GoodWeave organization. In addition to being happy every time the work of Goodweave is noted in the media, I was also pleasantly surprised to see that the piece also  included some words of wisdom from an old friend, John Howe, who is well known in the collector circles of Rugdom. John was helping to explain the distinction between production of carpets on a commercial scale which may exploit children for cheap labor, and the transmission of weaving skills from mother to daughter in cultures with an ancient tradition of rug-weaving, such as Persia (Iran) and Turkey.…

  • Project update on Ellison-Ashley rug

    We’ve been woefully lax in our blogging, and I have several project updates to do. I just added this photo of the Prairie-style design we did for a client earlier this year, based on her custom art glass window. You can read more about the origin of the design, and stained-glass artisan Theodore Ellison, on my original post.

  • What to do with new designs…

    Bloggers whose core business is not blogging face a unique set of challenges. It’s hard enough to keep a blog filled with new and interesting content when blogging/publicity/PR/social media is your business; it’s even harder to do when writing a blog post is not a core competency, but just one more thing on an already packed to-do list. I’m sure you know what I’m talking about. Anyway, after a recent Twitter conversation about this with award-winning interior designer Tobi Fairley , I was inspired by her short, sweet, and colorful post about a recent purchase.  I thought, “Hey! I can do brief and colorful.” So here’s a picture, along with…

  • The Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion project

    We just received these photos of our Pabst sample on loom. It’s very encouraging to finally see this design take on a three-dimensional life. This sample is being woven of Himalayan wool using the Tibetan cut-loop weaving technique. Making a sample, sometimes referred to as a “hand trial” or “strikeoff”, is often part of the process of creating a custom carpet. This allows us to confirm the color choices and color matching, and provide a more accurate representation of the look and feel of the finished carpet.

  • Theodore Ellison "art glass window" carpet

    We recently did a project with stained glass artisan Theodore Ellison, who designed a carpet for a private client to coordinate with his “Ashley” art glass window. The window: The carpet design: The carpet was made in India of pure New Zealand wool, which is both soft to the touch and very durable. And of course, RUGMARK-certified free of child labor. I’ll post a picture of the completed carpet as soon as I can. I thoroughly enjoyed working with Ted and look forward to doing more in the future. 12/14/09: I forgot to add the photo of the completed carpet.  It’s gorgeous, despite the bad lighting in the pic. (Yes,…